DAILY NEWS REPORTERS

Sylvie bommel

Sylvie Bommel is a journalist for Vanity Fair and Le Journal du Dimanche. She was previously editor-in- chief of the magazines L’Usine Nouvelle, Capital and Geo. She’s written many portraits over the years, and loves to quote Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple: “Human nature is very much the same anywhere, Sir Henry”. She has just published a book-length investigation of the Emmanuel and Brigitte Macron couple, He Had Just Turned Seventeen.

Roula khalaf

Roula Khalaf has been deputy editor of the Financial Times for the past three years. Before that, she was the foreign editor, running the FT’s network of foreign correspondents, and has also been the Middle East editor and Middle East correspondent. She won the Foreign Press Association’s Story of the Year award and was named Foreign Commentator of the Year. She was shortlisted for the British Press Awards and received special acclaim for her stories “The Muslim sisterhood” and “Qatar: from emirate to empire”. Before joining the FT, she was a staff writer for Forbes magazine in New York. She appears as the fictionalized character Aliyah Farran in Martin Scorsese’s film, The Wolf of Wall Street. In the non-fiction book of the same name, Jordan Belfort writes: “An insolent reporter from Forbes magazine, Roula Khalaf, coined me as a twisted version of Robin Hood, who robs from the rich and gives to himself and his merry band of brokers. She deserved an A for cleverness, of course.”

Miranda green

Miranda Green is deputy opinion editor at the Financial Times and was named the Culture, Diary and Social Commentator of the Year at the 2018 Comment Awards. Since 2000, she has worked as a reporter, columnist and editor across various departments of news and features, most notably education policy. She helped found The Day, an online news service for teenagers that supports young people in gaining confidence analysing and debating current affairs. Most of her waking hours are devoted to thinking about politics (and several years of a misspent youth were spent working in the House of Commons). She is a regular political pundit on television and radio.

Claer barrett

Claer Barrett is the personal finance editor of the Financial Times. Her responsibilities include producing the Money section in FT Weekend, presenting the FT Money Show podcast, and dispensing unofficial financial advice to everyone who works in the building. A financial journalist for nearly 20 years, her weekly Serious Money column has won three major press awards. She also presents a daily business and finance bulletin on Eddie Mair’s LBC drivetime radio show and is an expert on the BBC One television series Right on the Money.

Madhumita murgia

Madhumita Murgia writes about technology for the Financial Times and also features on its weekly podcast, Tech Tonic. She was previously a reporter and editor at Wired magazine and The Daily Telegraph, where she led technology coverage. She started out as a lab monkey – studying clinical immunology at Oxford – and spent months examining the T-cell immune response to HIV, before she escaped for the real world. Logically, she is one of 30 scientists featured in the book Successful Careers Beyond the Lab. She is particularly fascinated by the ripple effects of technology on people’s lives and has spoken on this subject around the world,from Tel Aviv to Vienna, Singapore and India, and given two TedX Talks: “How data brokers sold my identity” and “Your body: the next frontier in data privacy”.

robert shrimsley

Robert Shrimsley is the editorial director of the Financial Times and chief UK political commentator. After a spell as UK news editor, the FT took the bold decision to let him write a daily satirical column on the week’s news. Having offended almost everyone in the British government, he was then made the main news editor, leading the news coverage during the global financial crisis. After helping sink the world economy, he was given the task of leading the FT’s digital transformation as editor of ft.com. Digital subscriptions rose by more than 700,000 (he does not know all 700,000 subscribers personally). He originally joined the FT after ten years as a political correspondent for The Daily Telegraph – and coming to the realisation that the decisions which affected the country were not being taken at Westminster. Last July, in addition to his role on ft.com, he returned to Westminster to write the FT’s main political column and quickly changed his mind: decisions taken in Westminster really do affect the country. He is still figuring out if this a good thing.